Domain Names

About

More about Domain Names.

Domain names create an online identity to make it easier for people to find your website while reserving the online rights to your company/organisation name.  When a domain name is purchased such as mybusiness.co.nz, the rights are reserved to have mybusiness.co.nz in an email or website format - such as joebloggs@mybusiness.co.nz and www.mybusiness.co.nz.  Domain names can be purchased as a individually or with business mail and/or web hosting.

Every time you use a domain name, the internet's Domain Name Servers (DNS) translate the domain name (as you read it) into an IP address (as read by computers). As far as the internet is concerned, an IP address is all that you need to talk to a server. For example, you can type in your browser telecom.co.nz or http://202.27.184.102 and you will arrive at the Telecom webpage.  

Domain names are simply a user friendly way to display the information, Domain names;

  • Create an online presence making it easier for people to find your business online
  • Gives your email a professional look by personalising email addresses
  • Show your customers that a business is established, building credibility
  • Secures the name that best represents your business name, and keeps it out of the hands of competitors, protecting your business brand
  • With web hosting can give a small business a corporate image
  • Can give your business a global reach

Search for a New Domain Name
Transfer your domain name to Telecom

Terms & Conditions

Questions

What you need to know when working with a domain name:

  • The domain name itself and its STATUS. Is it active and is it registered?
  • The DNS. Who is the Authoritative DNS for the domain? All domains have an authoritative Primary and Secondary DNS. That's where the Zone files are kept
  • Can you see what's on the Zone file? If you are authoritative then you should have tools to see the zone
  • The two things a domain is used for are a website and email. Where the domain is currently pointing to?

Can I use more than one account number for registering or buying products on Telecom Business Hub?

No, you can only register one account number for all transactions on Telecom Business Hub.

Who owns the Domain Name?

In actual fact no one "owns" the name outright. However, the person named as the Name Holder at the time of registration will usually have the exclusive rights to use that domain name for the period of registration subject to any competing rights which may exist.

It is important to consider carefully who should be listed as the Name Holder. It is possible to list a company as the Name Holder.

Why doesn't my website appear when I enter my domain name?

If you have recently transferred your domain name or registered a new one, it typically takes between 12 and 36 hours for the domain name information to spread to servers worldwide. In some cases this may even take as long as 7 days. Once that process is complete, your website should appear correctly.

Alternatively you may have chosen not to renew your domain name and it has expired. When a domain name has expired, the website that it points to will no longer be publicly accessible.

Can I point a host name to multiple IP addresses at the same time?

Yes, it is possible to point a host name to multiple IP addresses simultaneously using Round Robin DNS. Round Robin DNS is a technique of load balancing. It's also a creative way to lighten the server and bandwidth requirements of hosting websites by using a series of IP addresses. This technique is particularly useful to companies whose websites get a large number of hits and/or a large number of bandwidth-consuming downloads.

For example, the host name ftp.example.com pointing to multiple IP Addresses using Round Robin DNS is shown as:
ftp   IN  A   192.168.0.4
ftp   IN  A   192.168.0.5
ftp   IN  A   192.168.0.6

Why would I need a CNAME?

There are a number of scenarios where a CNAME would be needed:
  • You could have a domain name that does not have an A record or any website hosting attached, and simply need to point to your active website. The easiest way to achieve this would be to add a CNAME record to your parked domain
  • You could add a CNAME to work like a sub domain. For example, you could request example.customerdomain.co.nz be CNAME'd to ghs.google.com. This is a requirement by Google to authorise a domain name before adding Google Mail records
  • You could have a domain or sub domain that has changed names. For example, from www.bighamburgers.co.nz to www.bigjuicyburgers.co.nz. In order to still get the website traffic that was going to bighamburgers.co.nz, you could do a CNAME from bighamburgers.co.nz to bigjuicyburgers.co.nz. In the DNS zone file this would be: www.bighamburgers.co.nz. 84600 IN CNAME www.bigjuicyburgers.co.nz. Now when someone visits www.bighamburgers.co.nz they will automatically redirect to www.bigjuicyburgers.co.nz

Is there any charge for getting a UDAI/EPP?

No, there is no charge.

What servers does Xtra run?

There are four servers:
New:
  • shelob.xtra.co.nz          202.27.158.40 (primary)
  • ungoliant.xtra.co.nz      202.27.156.72 (secondary)

Old:

  • alien.xtra.co.nz             202.27.184.3 (primary)
  • terminator.xtra.co.nz     202.27.184.5 (secondary)

What is a moderated domain, and who are authorised registrars for them?

There are six moderated second-level domains in .nz domain name space. The authorised registrars for these moderated domains are as follows:
  • govt.nz: The authorised registrar for the .govt.nz namespace is the Government Registrar
  • iwi.nz: Authorised registrar for the iwi.nz namespace is Free Parking
  • cri.nz: Authorised registrar for the cri.nz namespace is Domainz.
  • mil.nz: Authorised registrar for the mil.nz namespace is Domainz
  • health.nz: Authorised registrar for the health.nz namespace is One Square
  • parliament.nz: Authorised registrar for the parliament.nz namespace is Department of Internal Affairs

Why does the 'Date Billed Until' field say my domain is expiring in less than a month? And how do I renew it?

As the Registrar, Xtra automatically renews domain names each month on behalf of customers (as long as the appropriate payments had been made by customer). So there is nothing you need to do to have your .nz domain renewed. If the domain is 'pending release' due to payment, call our Collections team on 128 to organise it.

Managing your Domain Name

The Domain Manager can be used to make a number of changes to your domain name settings, and you can log into Domain Manager using your User ID and Password. For example, Domain Manager can be used to redirect your domain name to another URL, 'point' your email and your domain name to your current web host, or update your contact details.

To cancel a domain name, call 0800 BUSINESS (0800 28 74 63) for assistance. Telecom can only cancel domain names if the registrant (you) explicitly asks us to, or the renewal fees due on your account haven't been paid, or if compelled by a legal authority, e.g. by a Court Order.

New Domain Name Registrant Verification Requirements

Beginning in January 2014 the registrant/organization contact will need to be validated upon the purchase and transfer of a domain name or if the registrant's first or last name is changed.

The registrar will send an email to the contact email address on the domain to request confirmation. The registrant will need to click on a link, within the email, to confirm the information they provided and agree to T&C's. This email will be sent on day 5, 10, and 13 within the 15-day validation window. Messages on days 10 and 13 will be sent to admin, technical and billing contacts as well.

If the registrant fails to provide confirmation via the link provided in the prior email communications, a final message will be sent on day 16 to the registrant stating your domain has been suspended.

The same validation process will take place if a WHOIS Data Reminder Policy (WDRP) notice bounces. Therefore it is very important that the registrant information is correct.

Failing to receive a response will force the registrar to put the domain name on suspension, which makes the domain inactive. Customer's website or email or other services associated with or accessed through the domain name will stop working.

Transferring Domain Names

To transfer a domain name to Telecom you need:

  • The UDAI key or EPP code for your domain name (you can get this from your current registrar)
  • A domain name that isn't locked by the current registrar and doesn't have privacy protection enabled
  • A domain without an expired status. Once a domain is expired you will no longer be the legitimate owner of it, so renew your domain with your current registrar before sending us your transfer order
  • Your registry key, if the domain is already registered through a Melbourne IT (MIT) reseller channel (i.e. registrant is already MIT), so we can manually process their transfer request. (You will need to contact the current Melbourne IT reseller to obtain this key)
  • To ensure that the contact details for your domain name, including the Administrative Contact Email address, are up to date, and that you have access to that contact email address

 

  1. Submit an online request to transfer a domain name to Telecom
  2. Authorise the transfer of your domain name to Telecom
    Once you've submitted your request the current domain name Administrator will receive an email authorising the transfer.   If you are unsure who the Administrator is you can check it at http://dnc.org.nz by entering the domain name in the search box.  The Administrator will have 10 days to authorise the transfer request.  
  3. Notify the current Service Provider
    When you submit your request the company the domain name is currently registered with will also be sent an email to authorise the release of your domain name to Telecom.  They also have 5 days to authorise the release before the request becomes invalid.   

All steps must be complete within 10 days from requesting the transfer to be successful. Once all steps have been completed you will receive a confirmation email, advising that your domain name has been transferred to Telecom, along with the information you'll need to log in to your Control Panel to administer your domain name.

We strongly recommend that you request the transfer of your domain name at least 1 month before it is due to expire or be renewed with your current registrar. If your domain name has already expired or been cancelled with another registrar, you can still transfer it to Telecom, as long as it is less than 30 days since the cancellation or expiry (during this time no one else can register your domain name). Once you have transferred the name to Telecom, we can set it up again on your behalf. And if it has been 30 days or more, but that domain name is still available, then you may also submit a new registration.

If your domain name is due for renewal soon with your current registrar, we recommend you contact them for advice before requesting the transfer to Telecom. If the transfer is still underway when your current registrar requires you to pay a renewal fee, we cannot take any responsibility for that or any other fees your registrar may charge. In general, it is advised to first check any contractual obligations you may have entered into with your old registrar.

New Domain Name Registrant Verification Requirements
Beginning in January 2014 the registrant/organization contact will need to be validated upon the purchase and transfer of a domain name or if the registrant's first or last name is changed.

The registrar will send an email to the contact email address on the domain to request confirmation. The registrant will need to click on a link, within the email, to confirm the information they provided and agree to T&C's. This email will be sent on day 5, 10, and 13 within the 15-day validation window. Messages on days 10 and 13 will be sent to admin, technical and billing contacts as well.

If the registrant fails to provide confirmation via the link provided in the prior email communications, a final message will be sent on day 16 to the registrant stating your domain has been suspended.

The same validation process will take place if a WHOIS Data Reminder Policy (WDRP) notice bounces. Therefore it is very important that the registrant information is correct.

Failing to receive a response will force the registrar to put the domain name on suspension, which makes the domain inactive. Customer's website or email or other services associated with or accessed through the domain name will stop working.

When I transfer in, what is the period of my registration?
We automatically sign you up for one year when you transfer in. This is on top of anything you have paid your last domain name provider. For example, if you have paid another domain name provider up until 2012 and transfers in to Telecom, we then sign you up for an additional year, until 2013.

When can I transfer my Domain to another provider?
Yes, you can transfer your Domain Name registration to another provider at any time after the minimum registration period.

Type of Domain Name Minimum registration period - days from first registration
NZ domains (.nz) 5 days
International domains 60 days

Is there a fee for a domain transfer when there is no contract?
No.  You pay for the Domain Name Registration one-off annual fee up front (1 year minimum term for most and some has mandatory 2 year minimum term). Note: The Registrar (DNCL and MIT) have fees/charges set for minimum term.

Glossary

UDAI With each domain name you register, you are provided with a UDAI (Unique Domain Authentication Identifier). This code is used to validate that you are the actual owner of the domain, and so it is important that you retain this information and keep it in a safe place.The UDAI is used if you wish to change any details relating to the domain, such as name holder details and contacts, or to transfer the domain to another provider. Note that in the US they call this an Auth Code or EPP code.
WHOIS The database of all domain name Registrars (owners). WHOIS contains information about the Domain Name, name servers, registrants, and registration dates.
gTLD (generic top-level domain) The overall title given to the extensions on domain names, such as .com, .nz and .edu. You can see a list of the existing gTLDs at http://www.iana.org/domains/root/db/.
Domain name pointing The process of assigning an IP address to a domain name. In practical terms this link your Domain to your web site. If you have previously purchased a domain name from another domain name provider or registrar other than Telecom, and you would like to use it for your Telecom Hosted web site then it needs to be transferred across to Telecom or pointed in. This process points your domain name to the IP address of the server that is hosting your Telecom website.
DNS (Domain Name Service) Essentially a huge distributed database that stores information on how to find a domain name and its allocated resources on the internet. A DNS serves as a phone book for the Internet by translating human-friendly computer hostnames into IP addresses. For example, www.example.com translates to 208.77.188.166.
Zone file A text file that contains all the information about a domain, and lives on the server that administers the site. The zone file contains a number of resource records (RR), which define the mappings between the domain name and other resources:
  • A Records (tie to IP addresses of hostnames under the domain)
  • MX Records (mail server hostname)
  • NS Records (host server name)CNAME Records (another domain name) - CNAME stands for 'canonical name'
  • The authoritative contact (soa@xtra.co.nz) for the DNS server, known as SOA (Start of Authority record)
  • The IP addresses for any DNS servers that are considered 'authoritative' for the domain
  • The TTL (Time to Live) of the zone file - and any specific record that should have a non-standard TTL
Time to Live (TTL) These are set by an authoritative name server for a particular resource record. TTLs specify the length of time (in seconds) that an authoritative record is valid.
Shorter TTLs can cause heavier loads on an authoritative name server, but they can be useful when changing the address of critical services like web servers or MX records. They are often lowered by the DNS administrator prior to a service being moved, in order to minimise disruptions.

The units used are seconds. A common TTL value for DNS is 86,400 seconds (24 hours). A TTL value of 86,400 would mean if a DNS record was changed, DNS servers around the world could still be showing the old value from their cache for up to 24 hours after the change.
A record An A record is a forward DNS entry that is most commonly used to map hostnames to an IP address of the hosts.
CNAME CNAME is an alias of one name to another: the 'DNS lookup' will continue after querying the SOA zone, by retrying the lookup with the new name.
MX Record A MX (Mail Exchange) record maps a domain name to a list of mail exchange servers for that domain.
Sub Domain (4th Level Domain)

Essentially a domain name with a domain. More records can be associated to it than an A Record. There are two reasons why you would use a Sub Domain:

  • When you need to specify different MX Records for the Sub Domain (from the main domain MX records)
  • When you need to have host.host.domain.co.nz. (for example, sales.auckland.xtra.co.nz would need to be a Sub Domain). You cannot add a hostname.hostname as an A Record
IP address A series of numbers used to identify a location such as a web site on the internet. It is easier to remember a domain name (like www.telecom.co.nz) rather than a long IP address like 146.171.18.242; however, computers use IP addresses to access websites. To ensure that your browser can find the correct website when you enter www.yourdomain.co.nz your domain name needs to be 'pointed' to the IP address of the server that is hosting your website.
Domain name level  A top level domain name is the extension that follows the full stop in a domain name - .com, and co.nz are top level domain names. The name that precedes the full stop is the second level domain name - in telecom.co.nz the word telecom is the 2nd level domain name. A third level is sometimes present by preceding the 2nd level name - sales.telecom.co.nz contains sales as a third level domain name.
Domain name roles

When a customer buys a domain name, three basic things are created to identify who the domain belongs to and who looks after it:

  • A Registrar - This is the company that registered the domain name. It's often not the company from whom the customer bought the name (this is a 'reseller', also known as a 'service provider').The registrar is responsible for renewing the domain name. In many cases you won't be able to contact them directly, but will have to go through the reseller first.
  • An admin contact or registrant - This is the domain name's owner, whether it's a company or an individual.It's imperative that the admin or registrant email address is up to date as it's used to send renewal notices and or EPP/ UDAI requests to the owner. In some cases customers register domains with companies that will mask their details for security reasons. In these cases all communications have to go through the registrar.
  • A technical contact - The technical contact is usually responsible for the DNS - and in most cases the DNS is kept with the reseller or registrar. For example, when you register a domain name with Telecom, the registrar will show as Telecom (only for .nz domains) and by default the DNS will be Telecom.To get this type of information you'll have to do a whois. For .nz domains, a useful tool is the DNC page at dnc.co.nz.
Was this information helpful?
 
Answer Domain Names

Additional Feedback (optional)
We would love to hear your comments on how we can improve this answer